Happydog.....

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thebicker:

ppaction:

Via 4000 Years For Choice.
Quote via Esquire.

As I said before - controlling women’s sexuality is the entire reason the pro-life movement exists.
You have to, have to, HAVE TO read this Esquire piece about Dr. Willie Parker. He flies around the country to perform abortions in underserved places like Mississippi, which only have one clinic left. The most powerful part is this quote at the end:
He thought about his mother and sisters and the grandmother who died in childbirth and began to read widely in the literature of civil rights and feminism. Eventually he came across the concept of “reproductive justice,” developed by black feminists who argued that the best way to raise women out of poverty is to give them control of their reproductive decisions. Finally, he had his “come to Jesus” moment and the bell rang. This would be his civil-rights struggle. He would serve women in their darkest moment of need. “The protesters say they’re opposed to abortion because they’re Christian,” Parker says. “It’s hard for them to accept that I do abortions because I’m a Christian.”
Seriously, read it.

I would love to put this up on FB but I just don’t feel like dealing with family who won’t read the article, and will still feel the need to comment. I know I won’t change their mind.

thebicker:

ppaction:

Via 4000 Years For Choice.

Quote via Esquire.

As I said before - controlling women’s sexuality is the entire reason the pro-life movement exists.

You have to, have to, HAVE TO read this Esquire piece about Dr. Willie Parker. He flies around the country to perform abortions in underserved places like Mississippi, which only have one clinic left. The most powerful part is this quote at the end:

He thought about his mother and sisters and the grandmother who died in childbirth and began to read widely in the literature of civil rights and feminism. Eventually he came across the concept of “reproductive justice,” developed by black feminists who argued that the best way to raise women out of poverty is to give them control of their reproductive decisions. Finally, he had his “come to Jesus” moment and the bell rang. This would be his civil-rights struggle. He would serve women in their darkest moment of need. “The protesters say they’re opposed to abortion because they’re Christian,” Parker says. “It’s hard for them to accept that I do abortions because I’m a Christian.”

Seriously, read it.

I would love to put this up on FB but I just don’t feel like dealing with family who won’t read the article, and will still feel the need to comment. I know I won’t change their mind.

austinkleon:

William Styron, Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness

Last night @craigmod tweeted:


  If you cannot begin to empathize with someone taking their own life, I suggest reading Darkness Visible… Styron’s book is only 80 pages. Truly an important read


I picked it up last night and finished it today. Some bits, below.

On the inadequacy of the word “depression”:


  When I was first aware that I had been laid low by the disease, I felt a need, among other things, to register a strong protest against the word “depression.” Depression, most people know, used to be termed “melancholia,” a word which appears in English as the year 1303 and crops up more than once in Chaucer, who in his usade seemed to be aware of its pathological nuances. “Melancholia” would still appear to be a far more apt and evocative word for the blacker forms of the disorder, but it was usurped by a noun with a blank tonality and lacking any magisterial presence, used indifferently to describe an economic decline or a rut in the ground, a true wimp of a word for such a major illness.


How part of the problem with depression is that it’s somewhat beyond description, and almost impossible to fathom for those of us who haven’t experienced it:


  Depression is a disorder of mood, so mysteriously painful and elusive in the way it becomes known to the self—to the mediating intellect—as to verge close to being beyond description… it has to be emphasized that if the pain were readily describable most of the countless sufferers from this ancient affliction would have been able to confidently depict for their friends and loved ones (even their physicians) some of the actual dimensions of their torment, and perhaps elicit a comprehension that has been generally lacking; such incomprehension has usually been due not to a failure of sympathy but to the basic inability of healthy people to imagine a form of torment so alien to everyday experience.


Styron, however, does what he can to describe it to us:


  The pain is unrelenting, and what makes the condition intolerable is the foreknowledge that no remedy will come — not in a day, an hour, a month, or a minute. If there is mild relief, one knows that it is only temporary; more pain will follow. It is hopelessness even more than pain that crushes the soul. So the decision-making of daily life involves not, as in normal affairs, shifting from one annoying situation to another less annoying- or from discomfort to relative comfort, or from boredom to activity- but moving from pain to pain. One does not abandon, even briefly, one’s bed of nails, but is attached to it wherever one goes.


Recommended.

As someone who has struggled with depression for over 40 years, this is the best book I’ve ever read on this disease.

austinkleon:

William Styron, Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness

Last night @craigmod tweeted:

If you cannot begin to empathize with someone taking their own life, I suggest reading Darkness Visible… Styron’s book is only 80 pages. Truly an important read

I picked it up last night and finished it today. Some bits, below.

On the inadequacy of the word “depression”:

When I was first aware that I had been laid low by the disease, I felt a need, among other things, to register a strong protest against the word “depression.” Depression, most people know, used to be termed “melancholia,” a word which appears in English as the year 1303 and crops up more than once in Chaucer, who in his usade seemed to be aware of its pathological nuances. “Melancholia” would still appear to be a far more apt and evocative word for the blacker forms of the disorder, but it was usurped by a noun with a blank tonality and lacking any magisterial presence, used indifferently to describe an economic decline or a rut in the ground, a true wimp of a word for such a major illness.

How part of the problem with depression is that it’s somewhat beyond description, and almost impossible to fathom for those of us who haven’t experienced it:

Depression is a disorder of mood, so mysteriously painful and elusive in the way it becomes known to the self—to the mediating intellect—as to verge close to being beyond description… it has to be emphasized that if the pain were readily describable most of the countless sufferers from this ancient affliction would have been able to confidently depict for their friends and loved ones (even their physicians) some of the actual dimensions of their torment, and perhaps elicit a comprehension that has been generally lacking; such incomprehension has usually been due not to a failure of sympathy but to the basic inability of healthy people to imagine a form of torment so alien to everyday experience.

Styron, however, does what he can to describe it to us:

The pain is unrelenting, and what makes the condition intolerable is the foreknowledge that no remedy will come — not in a day, an hour, a month, or a minute. If there is mild relief, one knows that it is only temporary; more pain will follow. It is hopelessness even more than pain that crushes the soul. So the decision-making of daily life involves not, as in normal affairs, shifting from one annoying situation to another less annoying- or from discomfort to relative comfort, or from boredom to activity- but moving from pain to pain. One does not abandon, even briefly, one’s bed of nails, but is attached to it wherever one goes.

Recommended.

As someone who has struggled with depression for over 40 years, this is the best book I’ve ever read on this disease.

Mavis Gallant was born on this day in 1922.

thetinhouse:

“Writing is like a love affair: the beginning is the best part.”
― Mavis Gallant

Photo: “Writing is like a love affair: the beginning is the best part.”
― Mavis Gallant

Mavis Gallant was born on this day in 1922.
high-rollin:

brichibi:

untitled-titles:

i want to cry

He tried so hard.  And got so far.  But in the end.  It doesn’t even matter.

OMFG


Nope. Nope. Nice try though little guy.

high-rollin:

brichibi:

untitled-titles:

i want to cry

He tried so hard.  And got so far.  But in the end.  It doesn’t even matter.

OMFG

Nope. Nope. Nice try though little guy.

I’ve been blogging for 8 freaking years. — I Love Charts — Medium

Inspiring.

Aug 6
tothewatersandthewild:

(via TumbleOn)

tothewatersandthewild:

(via TumbleOn)

(Source: writing-dreamers)

Aug 4
georgetakei:

Absolutely adorable. Another cute pet moment from Awww Pets.

Hahahahahahahaha

georgetakei:

Absolutely adorable. Another cute pet moment from Awww Pets.

Hahahahahahahaha

Aug 3

WE WERE NEVER BORN

Always a bit reluctant to share these videos made to sell stuff—consumer culture anyone? But this is so beautifully done how could I resist?

(Source: vimeo.com)

Aug 2

My TV year, 2013

austinkleon:

Unlike movies, I watched a ton of TV this year, because 1) there’s a ridiculously great amount of decent TV shows running right now, and 2) 30-45 minutes is the perfect amount of turn-off-the-brain time for new parents. Here are 10 shows I liked:

Justified

Episode to episode, this…

Oh so yes to Justified. Took us a couple shows to get into it but once we did. Hooked.
And I have to also say I’m really having a love/hate relationship with Supernatural. I know I should be old enough to know better and the writing is a bit uneven at times. But the later seasons have some clever dialogue and storylines.

Aug 1

Horns Official Trailer (2014) - Daniel Radcliffe Movie HD - YouTube

I’m half way through this book and thought at the time it would make a great movie.